24 Best Cities To Visit In South America (Two Cities Per Country)

Best Cities To Visit In South America

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South America, a continent bursting with vibrant cultures, awe-inspiring landscapes, and cities that weave a tale of ancient civilizations blending seamlessly with modern-day urban life. From the passionate rhythms of tango in Argentina to the mystique of the Amazon in Brazil, every country offers its own unique charm. In this exploration, we’ll journey to the heart of 12 South American countries, highlighting two must-visit cities from each, to give you a taste of the continent’s endless allure.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Buenos Aires, often referred to as the “Paris of South America,” is a city of contrasts. With its broad avenues, grand colonial architecture, and vibrant arts scene, it’s a place where old-world charm meets contemporary flair.

Tango music fills the air in historic neighborhoods like San Telmo, where cobblestone streets play host to lively Sunday markets. The city’s love for its history is evident, yet its youthful spirit can be seen in trendy districts like Palermo, known for its buzzing nightlife, chic boutiques, and avant-garde galleries.

Buenos Aires isn’t just about its aesthetic charm; it’s also a gastronomic paradise. Argentine beef, considered among the best in the world, can be savored in the city’s iconic “parrillas” or steakhouses. The aroma of freshly baked empanadas fills the streets, while Maté, a traditional drink, becomes a social ritual in local parks.

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Amid all its liveliness, Buenos Aires manages to offer serene escapes, from the rose gardens of Palermo to the tranquil pathways of the Recoleta Cemetery.

Mendoza, Argentina

Mendoza, Argentina

Nestled at the foothills of the Andes Mountains, Mendoza is the heart of Argentina’s wine country. Famous primarily for its Malbec wines, the region boasts sprawling vineyards that provide not only a visual feast but an opportunity for visitors to indulge in some of the world’s most acclaimed vinos.

Many wineries in Mendoza offer guided tours, wine-tasting sessions, and gourmet meals with breathtaking mountain views as a backdrop.

While wine is undoubtedly Mendoza’s main attraction, it isn’t the only one. The city itself, with its leafy avenues, offers a relaxed atmosphere. The vast Parque San Martin invites visitors for leisurely strolls or picnics by the lake.

Adventure enthusiasts can explore the nearby Andes through hiking, horseback riding, or even white-water rafting. And when the snow graces its peaks, the mountains become a winter wonderland, perfect for skiing and snowboarding.

La Paz, Bolivia

La Paz, Bolivia

Perched high in the Andes, La Paz is the world’s highest capital city, offering a mix of indigenous and Mestizo cultures. At an altitude of around 3,650 meters, the city presents a stunning juxtaposition of ancient traditions with modern-day living.

The bustling Witches’ Market, for instance, offers a range of traditional herbs and potions, while the Mi Teleférico, one of the world’s highest cable car systems, provides a modern way to see the city from above.

The topography of La Paz is nothing short of dramatic. Buildings seem to cling to the sides of the canyon, and snow-capped Mount Illimani stands sentinel in the background.

Venturing outside the city, the Moon Valley, with its otherworldly landscapes created by erosion, and the iconic Death Road, a hotspot for thrill-seeking cyclists, offer unforgettable experiences.

Sucre, Bolivia

Sucre, Bolivia

Sucre, Bolivia’s constitutional capital, is a city that has preserved its colonial charm with grace. Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site, its streets are lined with whitewashed buildings, ornate churches, and lively squares.

Known as the “White City”, Sucre is a treasure trove of Spanish-era architecture and is home to several museums that chart the country’s rich history, such as the Casa de la Libertad where Bolivia’s declaration of independence was signed.

However, Sucre isn’t merely a window to the past; it’s a city alive with a contemporary beat. Its universities bring in a youthful vibe, and the local markets, like the Mercado Central, are a burst of colors and flavors.

Close to the city lies Cal Orcko, where one can view thousands of dinosaur footprints, adding a prehistoric dimension to the already diverse experiences Sucre offers.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Rio De Janeiro 1

Rio de Janeiro is an intoxicating blend of golden beaches, lush mountains, samba rhythms, and a spirit that’s impossible to resist. Iconic landmarks like the Christ the Redeemer statue atop Corcovado Mountain and the Sugarloaf Mountain, accessible by cable cars, offer panoramic views of a city that seems to dance to its own tune.

Copacabana and Ipanema beaches aren’t just stretches of sand; they’re the heartbeats of Rio, where both locals and tourists converge to celebrate life.

Yet, beyond the postcard-perfect views, lies a city with a rich cultural and historical tapestry. The vibrant Lapa district, with its colonial-style aqueducts and samba clubs, showcases Rio’s nightlife at its best.

Meanwhile, the Santa Teresa neighborhood, with its bohemian vibe, winding streets, and art studios, offers a glimpse into Rio’s artistic soul. Whether it’s the annual carnival’s pulsating energy or a simple sunset over the ocean, Rio consistently serves up unforgettable moments.

São Paulo, Brazil

São Paulo, Brazil

São Paulo, the pulsating heart of Brazil’s economy, is a sprawling metropolis renowned for its dynamic cultural scene, culinary delights, and architectural marvels. Often referred to as the “New York of South America,” São Paulo’s skyline is a mix of sleek skyscrapers and historic landmarks, reflecting the city’s evolution over the centuries.

The Paulista Avenue, the city’s main boulevard, buzzes with life, offering world-class museums, galleries, and theaters.

Beyond the hustle and bustle, São Paulo’s soul lies in its diverse neighborhoods. From the vibrant street art in Vila Madalena to the bustling markets in Liberdade, the city’s Japanese district, São Paulo is a melting pot of cultures.

Its culinary landscape mirrors this diversity, offering gourmet experiences that range from traditional Brazilian churrascarias to sushi bars and Italian pizzerias. Whether you’re indulging in the city’s nightlife or exploring its rich artistic heritage, São Paulo never ceases to amaze.

Santiago, Chile

Santiago, Chile

Nestled between the Andes and the Chilean Coastal Range, Santiago is a city that effortlessly marries natural beauty with urban sophistication. As the capital of Chile, it’s a vibrant urban center where colonial mansions coexist with soaring skyscrapers.

The Plaza de Armas, the city’s historic core, is a testament to Santiago’s rich history, adorned with iconic structures like the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Central Post Office.

However, Santiago isn’t just about its historical landmarks. The Bellavista neighborhood, with its bohemian vibe, is a haven for artists and writers, offering colorful street art, lively bars, and boutiques. And for those seeking solace in nature, the nearby San Cristóbal Hill provides breathtaking views of the city against the majestic backdrop of the Andes.

Whether you’re exploring its bustling markets or sipping on fine Chilean wine, Santiago promises a multifaceted experience.

Valparaíso, Chile

Valparaíso, Chile

Valparaíso, often dubbed “The Jewel of the Pacific,” is a coastal city that captivates visitors with its labyrinth of cobbled streets, historic funiculars, and vibrant houses perched on steep hillsides.

This UNESCO World Heritage site offers a delightful blend of maritime history, bohemian culture, and stunning seascapes. As you wander through its alleyways, you’ll find a canvas of murals and graffiti, each telling a story, making the city a veritable open-air museum.

Valparaíso’s charm doesn’t end with its visuals. The city’s pulsating cultural scene is evident in its galleries, workshops, and cafes. The historic port area buzzes with activity, as ships from distant lands anchor, adding to the city’s cosmopolitan vibe.

While the sea breezes invite relaxation, the nightlife, with its array of bars and clubs, ensures that the city’s energy never dwindles even as the sun sets.

Bogotá, Colombia

Bogotá, Colombia

Bogotá, the high-altitude capital of Colombia, is a city of contrasts. From colonial churches and cobblestone streets in La Candelaria, the old town, to the modern skyscrapers of the financial district, Bogotá is a reflection of Colombia’s past meeting its future.

The city’s vibrant heart, the Bolívar Square, is surrounded by iconic structures like the Cathedral and the Capitol.

Yet, beyond its historical core, Bogotá is a hub of cultural activity. The Gold Museum, with its stunning collection of pre-Columbian artifacts, and the Botero Museum, showcasing works by the renowned Colombian artist Fernando Botero, are testament to the city’s rich artistic heritage.

Culinary enthusiasts can delve into Bogotá’s gastronomic scene, where local delicacies meet global cuisines. And for those seeking a respite from the urban landscape, the Monserrate Hill offers panoramic views and a serene atmosphere, making Bogotá a city of endless discoveries.

Cartagena, Colombia

Cartagena, Colombia

Cartagena, with its colonial architecture, cobbled streets, and vibrant Caribbean spirit, is a dreamlike escape into history. Encircled by ancient walls, the city’s old town, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is a tapestry of plazas, churches, and colorful mansions adorned with bougainvillea.

Every corner of Cartagena seems to tell a story, from its fortresses that once fended off pirates to its lively squares where musicians and dancers celebrate life.

While the city’s past is palpable, Cartagena’s coastal allure is undeniable. Its golden beaches and azure waters invite relaxation and water adventures. The nearby Rosario Islands, a coral archipelago, is a paradise for snorkelers and sun-seekers alike.

As the sun sets, the city’s vibrant nightlife comes alive, with salsa rhythms echoing through the streets. Cartagena, with its blend of history and Caribbean charm, promises an experience that lingers long after the journey ends.

Quito, Ecuador

Quito, Ecuador

Quito, the capital of Ecuador, stands high in the Andean foothills at an altitude of 2,850m. Steeped in history, it was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site due to its well-preserved colonial center. Ancient monasteries, ornate churches, and sprawling plazas make Quito a window into the past.

The city is crowned by the Virgen del Panecillo, a statue offering panoramic views of the sprawling urban landscape below. But beyond its historic allure, Quito is also a gateway to the natural wonders of Ecuador, being close to the equatorial line and the renowned “Middle of the World” monument.

Modern Quito is a harmonious blend of the traditional and contemporary. The La Mariscal district is a testament to this, brimming with lively cafes, international restaurants, and vibrant nightlife.

Meanwhile, its proximity to the Andes and the Amazon offers adventures ranging from mountain hiking to rainforest treks. Whether you’re wandering through its historic streets or marveling at the surrounding landscapes, Quito offers a rich and varied experience.

Cuenca, Ecuador

Cuenca, Ecuador

Cuenca, a jewel in southern Ecuador, charms visitors with its red-tiled roofs, cobblestone streets, and colonial architecture. Like Quito, Cuenca’s historic center is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a testament to its significance and beauty.

The city is a mosaic of churches, with the blue-domed Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception being a centerpiece. Its museums, particularly the Pumapungo Museum, offer a dive into the rich indigenous and colonial histories of the region.

Cuenca, however, is not just about its past. The city boasts a vibrant arts scene, with galleries, workshops, and cultural events reflecting its creative spirit. The Tomebamba River, which slices through the city, provides tranquil spots for relaxation.

Close to Cuenca, the Cajas National Park beckons with its high-altitude lakes and unique tundra vegetation, making the city a perfect blend of urban charm and natural beauty.

Georgetown, Guyana

Georgetown, Guyana

Georgetown, Guyana’s capital, is often called the ‘Garden City of the Caribbean.’ It presents a unique blend of Dutch colonial, Victorian, and Caribbean architecture. The iconic St. George’s Cathedral, one of the world’s tallest wooden churches, stands as a testament to the city’s architectural grandeur.

As you wander through Georgetown, the wide avenues lined with trees and old colonial mansions evoke a sense of nostalgia.

Beyond its architectural gems, Georgetown is a melting pot of cultures. The markets, particularly Stabroek Market, are bustling hubs of activity, offering a vibrant array of foods, crafts, and stories.

The sea wall, overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, is a popular spot for both locals and visitors, providing respite and beautiful sunset views. With its rich history and diverse culture, Georgetown offers a distinctive Caribbean experience.

New Amsterdam, Guyana

New Amsterdam, Guyana

New Amsterdam, situated along the eastern bank of the Berbice River, is a historic town that showcases Guyana’s colonial past. Once a Dutch administrative center, it features many buildings and sites that hark back to a time of European rule.

The Town Hall and All Saints’ Anglican Church stand as beautiful remnants of this bygone era, reflecting the architectural styles of the 19th century.

However, New Amsterdam is not just anchored in its past. As the regional capital of East Berbice-Corentyne, it is a bustling urban center. The Berbice River, with its scenic beauty, is central to the town’s identity, providing opportunities for river tours and relaxation.

As a gateway to the eastern parts of Guyana, New Amsterdam serves as a starting point for many exploring the country’s diverse landscapes and cultures.

Asunción, Paraguay

Asunción, Paraguay

Asunción, the capital of Paraguay, is a city that seamlessly fuses the past and the present. Overlooking the Paraguay River, its skyline is a mix of modern high-rises and historic structures. The Palacio de los López, the seat of the government, and the Metropolitan Cathedral are iconic landmarks that highlight the city’s colonial past.

Lively street markets, like the Mercado 4, offer a colorful array of local goods and foods, giving visitors a taste of Paraguay’s vibrant culture.

Beyond its historic and cultural sites, Asunción has a dynamic contemporary scene. Its nightlife is buzzing with bars, clubs, and live music venues showcasing local and international talents.

Numerous parks and green spaces, like the Ñu Guasu Park, provide urban oases for relaxation and recreation. With its warm-hearted locals and diverse experiences, Asunción is a testament to Paraguay’s rich heritage and modern aspirations.

Ciudad del Este, Paraguay

Ciudad del Este, Paraguay

Ciudad del Este, the second-largest city in Paraguay, is a dynamic hub nestled at the tri-border area shared with Brazil and Argentina. Famous for its bustling commerce, visitors and locals swarm its streets, looking for electronics, clothing, and other goods in the myriad of shops.

Beyond commerce, Ciudad del Este is a gateway to natural attractions, most notably the Itaipu Dam, one of the world’s largest hydroelectric projects, and the breathtaking Iguazu Falls, just a short distance away.

The city’s vibrant atmosphere extends to its multicultural spirit, influenced by a mix of Guarani traditions and various immigrant communities. Amidst the urban hustle, there are pockets of tranquility, like the Buddhist Temple, which offers serene surroundings and panoramic views of the city.

With its mix of commerce, culture, and proximity to natural wonders, Ciudad del Este is an intriguing blend of the modern and the timeless.

Lima, Peru

Lima, Peru

Lima, the capital city of Peru, is often the first stop for travelers eager to explore the Andean nation. Perched on the Pacific coast, Lima is a blend of colonial charm and contemporary dynamism.

The historic center, with its grand cathedrals and palaces, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, a testament to the city’s rich history. The Larco Museum further paints a vivid picture of Peru’s ancient cultures with its exquisite collection of pre-Columbian artifacts.

However, Lima isn’t solely about the past. The district of Miraflores, with its beautiful seaside parks, modern shopping centers, and gourmet restaurants, showcases the city’s modern face.

Lima is also a gastronomic capital, offering a diverse culinary landscape that ranges from street food delicacies to high-end restaurants, exemplifying the rich flavors of Peruvian cuisine. With its cultural richness and coastal charm, Lima is a South American gem waiting to be explored.

Cusco, Peru

Cusco, Peru

Cusco, once the capital of the Inca Empire, is a city where ancient history resonates in every cobblestone and courtyard. Nestled in the Andes Mountains, its well-preserved colonial architecture stands alongside Inca ruins, creating a unique urban landscape.

The city’s heart, the Plaza de Armas, is surrounded by structures like the Cusco Cathedral and the Church of the Society of Jesus, offering glimpses into its rich past.

Beyond its architectural beauty, Cusco serves as the gateway to the Sacred Valley and the iconic Machu Picchu. As such, its vibrant streets are often filled with travelers from around the world, infusing the city with a cosmopolitan vibe.

Local markets like San Pedro brim with colorful textiles, handicrafts, and foods, while its culinary scene offers both traditional and contemporary flavors of the Andes. Cusco, with its blend of history, culture, and natural beauty, is a must-visit on any South American journey.

Montevideo, Uruguay

Montevideo, Uruguay

Montevideo, the capital and largest city of Uruguay, is a coastal gem that offers a relaxed yet vibrant atmosphere. Overlooking the Río de la Plata, the city boasts a scenic waterfront, with the Rambla serving as a popular spot for walks, sports, and sunsets.

Montevideo’s Ciudad Vieja, the old town, is a maze of colonial-era architecture, art galleries, and cafes that come alive, particularly during the evening.

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The city’s European influence is evident not just in its architecture but also in its cultural pursuits. Tango music, reminiscent of its neighbors, fills the air in local milongas, while the city’s theaters and cultural centers offer a rich array of performances and exhibitions.

Montevideo also stands out for its culinary delights, especially the parrillas (steakhouses) that showcase Uruguay’s famed beef. With its blend of historical charm and modern comforts, Montevideo offers a uniquely Uruguayan experience.

Punta del Este, Uruguay

Punta del Este, Uruguay

Punta del Este, often dubbed the “Monaco of the South,” is Uruguay’s most famous beach resort town. Located on a narrow peninsula, it boasts both serene sunrises on the Playa Mansa and stunning sunsets on the Playa Brava.

The town is synonymous with luxury and glamour, attracting visitors from around the world to its sandy shores, upscale restaurants, and vibrant nightlife. The iconic “La Mano” sculpture, a giant hand emerging from the sand, is a testament to the town’s artistic spirit.

Yet, there’s more to Punta del Este than its glitzy facade. The town is a haven for art enthusiasts, with spaces like the Ralli Museum offering impressive collections of Latin American art. Nearby, the serene Casapueblo, a building and art workshop created by artist Carlos Páez Vilaró, provides breathtaking views of the coastline.

Whether you’re seeking beachside relaxation, cultural exploration, or a taste of luxury, Punta del Este promises a memorable experience.

Caracas, Venezuela

Caracas, Venezuela

Caracas, the capital city of Venezuela, is nestled in a beautiful valley surrounded by the majestic Avila Mountain range. This dynamic urban center has been a witness to pivotal moments in Latin American history. The birthplace of Simón Bolívar, the liberator of much of South America from Spanish rule, Caracas is replete with monuments and sites dedicated to his legacy.

The National Pantheon, where Bolívar rests, and the historic center with its colonial architecture are just a few of the city’s many cultural offerings.

However, Caracas is not only about history. The city is a tapestry of urban life with modern skyscrapers, bustling markets, and vibrant neighborhoods. Parks like the East Park (Parque del Este) offer urban oases, showcasing the country’s rich biodiversity.

The city’s culinary scene is a testament to its multicultural essence, offering an array of flavors, from traditional arepas to international cuisines. With its blend of the past and present, Caracas offers a unique window into Venezuelan life.

Maracaibo, Venezuela

Maracaibo, Venezuela

Maracaibo, Venezuela’s second-largest city, stands proudly by the shores of Lake Maracaibo, South America’s largest lake. Often referred to as the “Beloved Land of the Sun,” Maracaibo is known for its distinctive culture, music, and traditions, including the spirited gaita genre of music.

The city’s architecture, with the Baralt Theatre and the Basilica of Our Lady of the Rosary of Chiquinquirá, reflects its colonial and religious history.

The iconic General Rafael Urdaneta Bridge, connecting both sides of Lake Maracaibo, is a marvel of engineering and offers breathtaking views at sunset. The region’s tropical climate has fostered rich biodiversity, making it a hub for ecotourism.

Maracaibo’s warm, spirited locals, known for their distinct accent and vivacity, add to the city’s charm. Whether you’re exploring its historical sites, savoring its culinary delights, or enjoying the lake views, Maracaibo promises an authentic Venezuelan experience.

Paramaribo, Suriname

Paramaribo, Suriname

Paramaribo, the capital of Suriname, is a city where cultural diversity is celebrated at every corner. Its historic center, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a testament to the fusion of Dutch colonial architecture with local traditions and materials.

Notable landmarks like the Saint Peter and Paul Cathedral, made entirely of wood, and the Arya Dewaker Hindu Temple reflect the city’s multicultural tapestry.

The Waterkant, Paramaribo’s riverfront promenade, is a lively spot where locals and visitors gather, especially during the evening. The city’s markets, such as the Central Market, bustle with energy, offering a range of goods from fresh produce to crafts.

Paramaribo’s culinary scene, influenced by its diverse populace, including Javanese, Chinese, African, and Amerindian communities, promises a delightful gastronomic journey. With its rich history, diverse culture, and serene river views, Paramaribo is a captivating South American gem.

Nieuw Nickerie, Suriname

Nieuw Nickerie, Suriname

Nieuw Nickerie, the second-largest city in Suriname, is a tranquil town located on the estuary of the Nickerie River, close to the Atlantic coast. As a significant rice-producing region, its surroundings are dotted with lush rice paddies, offering a scenic countryside landscape.

The Zeedijk, a sea wall built to prevent coastal erosion, has become a popular spot for both locals and visitors, providing sweeping views of the vast Atlantic.

Nieuw Nickerie provides a glimpse into Suriname’s multicultural landscape, with its mosques, Hindu temples, and churches coexisting harmoniously. The city’s market is a focal point of daily life, showcasing the rich produce of the region.

For those looking to explore natural wonders, nearby attractions like the Bigi Pan Nature Reserve offer opportunities for bird watching and eco-tours. Nieuw Nickerie, with its serene environment and warm hospitality, offers a relaxing retreat in the heart of Suriname.

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